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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Salt-Production at Kibiro
Authors:Connah, Graham
Kamuhangire, E.
Piper, A.
Year:1990
Periodical:Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa
Volume:25
Pages:27-41
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs., ills.
Geographic terms:Uganda
East Africa
Subjects:salt industry
History and Exploration
Anthropology and Archaeology
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
science and technology
Kibiro (Uganda)
salt
Dried foods
External link:https://doi.org/10.1080/00672709009511406
Abstract:The production of salt at Kibiro, on the eastern shore of Lake Albert (Uganda), is carried out in a basically traditional manner, although the present century has seen some changes in the equipment used and in social and economic organization. Because of the location of Kibiro and the peculiar circumstances of its environment, trade in salt is vital for the continued viability of the village. The production of salt at Kibiro and its marketing is an exclusively female occupation. Women boil brine obtained from leaching saline earth, the salt in which originates from several hot springs at the base of the Western Rift escarpment. An unusual feature of the technique employed is the repeated spreading of loose dry earth on the surface of the salt-bearing deposits, thus absorbing salty moisture from the ground surface which is in turn evaporated by the sun, gradually increasing the salt content of the loose earth. It is this earth which is subsequently leached and then recycled to be used again and again on the so-called 'salt gardens'. Archaeological evidence suggests that salt-making at Kibiro, which was first reported over a century ago, has probably been practised for 700-800 years. It seems likely that it was an important economic factor in the development of the former Kingdom of Bunyoro. App., bibliogr., notes.
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