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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Community participation and rural water supply development in Sierra Leone
Author:Bah, O.M.
Year:1992
Periodical:The Community Development Journal: An International Journal for Community Workers
Volume:27
Issue:1
Pages:30-41
Language:English
Geographic term:Sierra Leone
Subjects:popular participation
development projects
oases
External link:http://search.proquest.com/pao/docview/1304149678
Abstract:Provision of improved water wells is part of the integrated approach to rural development, currently undertaken by development agencies in Sierra Leone. Community self-help in meeting part of the cost of input to be provided is essential in promoting the effective utilization of the service provided. This study surveys the improved water wells programme of Plan International Rural Development Project in Makari-Gbanti Chiefdom, Northern Province of Sierra Leone. Fieldwork lasted 12 months covering two consecutive dry seasons (November-April 1988/1989 and 1989/1990). Compared with traditional water sources the improved wells were found to be less effective in meeting dry season water supplies to villagers. Among the factors responsible for this situation is the ill-conceived nature of the community self-help development strategy adopted. Villagers were willing to meet part of the cost of the improved wells not because of the genuinely felt need for the system, but because they were interested in the associated benefits of the integrated package - roads, schools, health centres, community centres, etc. The final section introduces a case study (the village of Gbonombu, near Moyamba, Moyamba District) of a successful water supply scheme implemented through a well-conceived community involvement strategy. Lively community self-help is the key to promoting effectively manned schemes in Sierra Leone. Bibliogr.
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