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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Technical cooperation administration in Tanzania: unresolved policy issues
Author:Rugumamu, S.ISNI
Year:1992
Periodical:The African Review: A Journal of African Politics, Development and International Affairs
Volume:19
Issue:1-2
Pages:78-97
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs., ills.
Geographic terms:Tanzania
East Africa
Subjects:technical cooperation
international relations
Development aid
Abstract:Technical cooperation resources are aimed at enhancing human and institutional capabilities through the transfer, adaptation and utilization of knowledge, skills and technology. In Tanzania, the share of technical cooperation resources in the total aid flow has, over the period 1980-1989, averaged about 33 percent. This article examines Tanzania's experiences in administering technical cooperation resources. Case studies of the Mbegani Fisheries Development Centre and the Uyole Agricultural Centre are illustrative of the many poorly conceived, designed, and executed projects. By contrast, the Sokoine University of Agriculture's two new faculties of Forestry and Veterinary Medicine have managed to acquire and assimilate technology through technical cooperation with some success. The author concludes that the nature and capability of the recipient institution is a major determinant of technical cooperation effectiveness. At the same time, the failure to institute a comprehensive national technical cooperation resources policy framework in Tanzania tends to jeopardize the chances for effective technical cooperation. In the absence of a policy framework, the design and implementation of technical cooperation resources projects will be determined by the interests and 'hidden agendas' of international development agencies, and their impact is likely to be marginal at best and destructive at worst. App., bibliogr., notes.
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