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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Some Ghanaian mothers recall of ARI episode
Author:Awedoba, Albert K.ISNI
Year:1996
Periodical:African Anthropology (ISSN 1024-0969)
Volume:3
Issue:1
Period:March
Pages:65-90
Language:English
Geographic term:Ghana
Subjects:respiratory diseases
Health and Nutrition
Women's Issues
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Health, Nutrition, and Medicine
Cultural Roles
Abstract:The present paper discusses the results of a WHO-sponsored study on the incidence of acute respiratory infections in Ghana and the local beliefs, perceptions and practices relating to them. It is based largely on in-depth interviews with 30 mothers in Jirapa in the Upper West Region. Their children ranged in age from a few weeks to three years. The study indicated that Dagaaba mothers have a fair understanding of the causes of acute respiratory infections and display an awareness of the signs and symptoms of these infections, such as dyspnea, difficult breathing, chest in-drawing and wheezing. However, they did not mention rapid breathing or nasal flaring and they tended to report acute respiratory infections in association with other illness conditions, notably fever and diarrhoea, without distinguishing consistently between an illness term and an illness sign or symptom. Fever was the symptom which most frequently triggered health-seeking behaviour. Mothers were more likely to report to a health centre, clinic or hospital only where such a facility was available locally. Otherwise self-care or home care was more likely. Loss of appetite was remarked on by mothers when they were asked about feeding patterns, although they did not advance this as an illness sign. Bibliogr., notes.
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