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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Issues and Trends on Religious Tolerance in Nigeria: The Contemporary Scene
Author:Kilani, Abdul Razaq O.ISNI
Year:1996
Periodical:Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs
Volume:16
Issue:2
Period:July
Pages:273-278
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:Christianity
Islam
Church and State
Religion and Witchcraft
Ethnic and Race Relations
Muslim-Christian relations
External link:https://doi.org/10.1080/13602009608716343
Abstract:The relationship between State and religion in Nigeria has continued to occupy a central position due to the continuing demands of the two major religions - Islam and Christianity - to play an active role in the affairs of the nation-State. This development has been accompanied by differences arising from a number of issues, namely the demand of Muslims for adequate provision of 'sharia' law in the Nigerian legal system; the controversial membership of Nigeria in the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC); the newfound style of evangelism propagated by the leadership of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN); the Euro-Christian and slavish propaganda of the Nigerian press; and the present economic crisis in Nigeria which has resulted in frequent economic and tribal riots, often referred to as 'religious' riots in the Nigerian press. The open criticism of Islam and its institutions by the Christians, and the increasing tension between the two communities, has created an urgent need for 'religious dialogue' between Muslims and Christians in Nigeria. The Muslim position has been complicated by the emergence of a tendency, among Muslims themselves, to reconcile and reach a compromise often through misinterpretation of the Koran and Islamic institutions in the pursuit of 'religious dialogue and tolerance'. Ref.
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