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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Religion and Ethics in Korekore Society
Author:Bourdillon, M.F.C.ISNI
Year:1979
Periodical:Journal of Religion in Africa
Volume:10
Issue:2
Pages:81-94
Language:English
Geographic term:Zimbabwe
Subjects:ethics
African religions
Korekore
Religion and Witchcraft
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/1581054
Abstract:The Korekore people are members of the Shona-speaking cluster of peoples, and are situated in the extreme north-east of Rhodesia/Zimbabwe. Using mainly data collected during two years of intensive field research form 1969 to 1971, supported by four years of less intensive contact with the communities among whom the author lived, and also drawing a little on data colected by Kingley Garbett among related communities in the early 1960s, and occasionally on other material on Shona peoples, the author investigates the relationship between religious precepts, whether pronounced by some authoritative religious official or contained in oral traditions, and ethical norms according to which people make moral judgements. It is the status of religious authority in matters of morals and ethics that the author examines with respect to Korekore society. Accepting Robin Horton's definition of religion in terms of the extension of social relationships beyond purely human society, in this case to personal spiritual powers, the author deals with those generically called midzimu in Korekore religion. Notes.
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