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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:A Theology of Modernity: Hasan al-Turabi and Islamic Renewal in Sudan
Author:Ibrahim, Abdullahi A.
Year:1999
Periodical:Africa Today
Volume:46
Issue:3-4
Period:Summer/Fall
Pages:195-222
Language:English
Geographic term:Sudan
Subjects:Islamic movements
politicians
Politics and Government
Religion and Witchcraft
Islamism
political Islam
About person:.Hasan 'Abd AllŻah Daf' AllŻah al- TurŻabŻi (1932-)ISNI
Link:http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/africa_today/v046/46.3ibrahim.pdf
Abstract:Writings about Hasan al-Turabi (1932-), the leader of the Islamic renewal in Sudan, assume or suggest that his Islamic revival is a continuation of his family's clerical, Sufi and Mahdist traditions, which go back to the seventeenth century. This association with his family and ancestors from Wad al-Turabi village on the Blue Nile south of Khartoum, who have a long tradition of teaching Islamic sciences and practising Sufism, diminishes al-Turabi to a mere bearer of tradition. The present article discusses al-Turabi's theology as it bears on tradition and modernity, based on his numerous pamphlets and books, written mostly in Arabic, and a number of interviews, including the author's 1996 session with him. It is argued that al-Turabi's theology of modernity is not a mere synthesis of tradition and modernity. In his eyes, Islam is divinely endowed to humanize the realities of modernity, and harness them for a more intimate worshipping of God. His theology is about the coming together of the traditional and the modern. In less than four decades, his 'theology of modernity', articulated through the concept of 'ibtila', the challenges posed by God to test a Muslim's faith, has transformed the Muslim Brotherhood of the 1940s and 1950s beyond recognition and has prevailed among students, the 'effendis' or civil servants and other graduates of modern schools, and army officers. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
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