Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home African Women Go to database home

bibliographic database
Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Semantics of Female Devaluation in Igbo Proverbs
Author:Oha, Obododimma
Year:1998
Periodical:African Study Monographs
Volume:19
Issue:2
Period:October
Pages:87-102
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subjects:Igbo
women
proverbs
Women's Issues
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Cultural Roles
External link:https://jambo.africa.kyoto-u.ac.jp/kiroku/asm_normal/abstracts/pdf/19-2/87-102.pdf
Abstract:There is an Igbo proverb which states that 'proverbs are the palm oil with which words are eaten'. However, the inferiorization of women in Igbo proverbs, and sex bias in their use, clearly undermine their integrity as expressions of folk wisdom. Men, as producers and users of proverbs, are in this way also indirectly undermining their own image as humane persons catering for the 'face wants' of both sexes. The author's analysis of fifty Igbo proverbs relating to womanhood collected from both rural and urban discourse contexts between July 1992 and March 1993 indicates that the proverbs of womanhood in Igboland, Nigeria, attempt to denigrate and disempower women. The representations of womanhood are mainly negative; women are typically portrayed as senseless, morally debased, devilish, childish, and weak. The fact that these stereotypes have been encoded in a form of communication highly valued in Igbo culture suggests the degree to which rhetoric in Igbo society has been masculinized. App., bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
Views

Cover