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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:The Psychosocial Effects of Organized Violence and Torture: A Pilot Study Comparing Survivors and Their Neighbours in Zimbabwe
Authors:Reeler, A.P.
Mhetura, J.
Year:2000
Periodical:Journal of Social Development in Africa (ISSN 1012-1080)
Volume:15
Issue:2
Period:July
Pages:137-168
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs., ills.
Geographic terms:Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
Subjects:victims
terrorism
Law, Human Rights and Violence
Ethnic and Race Relations
Health and Nutrition
Philosophy, Psychology
war
torture
violence
Psychological aspects
Abstract:This pilot study compares survivors of organized violence and torture with their neighbours. The study was carried out in one area of Zimbabwe that experienced epidemic levels of violence during the 1970 war of liberation. Persons who had sought assistance from the AMANI Trust, a Zimbabwean NGO working with survivors of organized violence and torture, were compared with those who had not. The findings indicated that the survivors were more economically and socially deprived than their neighbours in many key areas, especially the areas of employment, income, food security and housing. In addition, survivors showed indications of lower self-esteem and belief that they could change their situation. The findings suggest that survivors of organized violence and torture represent a disabled group that may require targeted assistance by the State in order to overcome the social adversity they experience. The findings also indicate the need to assess more carefully the psychological as well as the medical consequences of organized violence and torture. Bibliogr., sum.
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