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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Land Reform and Changing Social Relations for Farm Workers in Zimbabwe
Authors:Moyo, SamISNI
Rutherford, Blair
Amanor-Wilks, Dede
Year:2000
Periodical:Review of African Political Economy
Volume:27
Issue:84
Period:June
Pages:181-202
Language:English
Geographic term:Zimbabwe
Subjects:agricultural workers
land reform
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
Law, Human Rights and Violence
Development and Technology
Labor and Employment
External links:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03056240008704454
http://ejournals.ebsco.com/direct.asp?ArticleID=49AFA211D72C6041F667
Abstract:This article assesses the problem of extending social, political and land rights to farm workers in Zimbabwe's commercial farming sector in the context of current debates about land redistribution in the country. It provides a theoretical critique of the three approaches that have dominated the discussion on farm workers and land resettlement in the 1990s - the nationalist, workerist, and welfarist approaches. It contrasts traditional indifference to farm workers with more recent attempts to address their needs and explores the difficulties land redistribution could present for farm workers if their interests are not made part of the agenda of change. It proposes an alternative, transformative approach to land rights which incorporates farm workers. This approach entails a holistic development agenda that incorporates and goes beyond the workerist and welfarist approaches while dramatically enhancing the productivity of commercial farming. Rights to land for farm workers, the authors argue, will help transform the broader, structural conditions that lead to their generally poor social and working conditions, and the present inefficiencies that have characterized commercial agriculture in Zimbabwe since colonialism. Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum.
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