Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home African Women Go to database home

bibliographic database
Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:In/Through the Bodies of Women: Rethinking Gender in African Politics
Author:Mire, Amina
Year:2000
Periodical:SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review (ISSN 1024-9451)
Volume:4
Issue:1
Pages:1-23
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Southern Africa
Africa
Subjects:culture contact
Western culture
African culture
gender relations
Politics and Government
Law, Legal Issues, and Human Rights
Sex Roles
gender
Women's role
political science
imperialism
Violence against women
External link:https://www.ajol.info/index.php/safere/article/view/23986
Abstract:One of the central Western imports into African social and political thought is the alienation of men from nature, men from women, knowledge from the knower, and public life from private life. This dualist turn had and still has profoundly destructive epistemological, political and cultural implications. The present essay interrogates the specific ways through which Western dualistic epistemology and masculinist prerogative have impacted on the history of African political thought, from its initial colonial encounter to the present. One of its central tasks is to trace the close historical connection between colonizing the female body as a site of male domination in Western male centred dualist epistemology and particular modes through which the African female body figured both materially and discursively in the European colonial domination of African cultures and peoples, including women. To overcome dualistic epistemology and masculinist prerogative the construction of new concepts, paradigms and research methods is needed; a feminist epistemology capable of problematizing the boundaries between the public and the private and representing the complex and, in many cases, contradictory lived experiences of African women. Bibliogr., ref. (Also published in: Polis, vol. 8, no. spéc. (2001), p. 65-85.)
Views