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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:'Some are More White than Others': Racial Chauvinism as a Factor in Rhodesian Immigration Policy, 1890 to 1963
Author:Mlambo, Alois S.
Year:2000
Periodical:Zambezia (ISSN 0379-0622)
Volume:27
Issue:2
Pages:139-160
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms:Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
Great Britain
Subjects:immigration
colonists
Europeans
colonialism
Ethnic and Race Relations
History and Exploration
Peoples of Africa (Ethnic Groups)
Politics and Government
Urbanization and Migration
History, Archaeology
Race discrimination
Emigration and immigration
Whites
imperialism
history
Interethnic relations
External link:http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/africanjournals/html/itemdetail.cfm?recordID=1193
Abstract:Despite the outward semblance of unity, the white community in Southern Rhodesia (present-day Zimbabwe) was deeply divided by, amongst others, racism and cultural chauvinism which emanated mostly from the settlers of British stock, evoking equally strong reactions from other white groups in the country such as Afrikaners. The racist attitudes of the politically, economically and numerically dominant British settlers were clearly evident in Rhodesia's immigration policy up to the Federation with Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland in 1953, and this frustrated the efforts of thousands of would-be non-British white settlers, such as Poles, Afrikaners, Jews, and Greeks, to enter and settle in the country. As a result the Rhodesian white population remained small throughout the period under review (1890-1963). While the original colonizers and their governments cherished the dream of building Rhodesia as a white man's country, the dream was never fulfilled because of Rhodesia's failure to attract large numbers of white settlers. Notes, ref., sum.
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