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Conference paper Conference paper Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Fashioning Africa: power and the politics of dress
Editor:Allman, Jean MarieISNI
Year:2004
Pages:247
Language:English
Series:African expressive cultures
City of publisher:Bloomington, IN
Publisher:Indiana University Press
ISBN:0253344158; 0253216893
Geographic terms:Mali
Ghana
Nigeria
Angola
Kenya
Somalia
Zanzibar
Tanzania
Zambia
Subjects:2001
diasporas
clothing
female dress
symbols of power
textiles
conference papers (form)
Abstract:This collective volume, which is based on papers presented on two panels at the 2001 meeting of the African Studies Association in Houston, Texas, explores dress practice as it is embedded in fields of power - economic, political, gendered, or generational - in order to probe the ways in which modifications of the body through clothing have been used to constitute and to challenge power in Africa and its diaspora. Part 1 (Fashioning unity: women and dress; power and citizenship) contains chapters on dress and identity on Zanzibar (Laura Fair); dress and politics in post-World War II Abeokuta, western Nigeria (Judith Byfield); nationalism and dress of Somali women in Minnesota (Heather Marie Akou). Part 2 (Dressing modern: gender, generation, and invented (national) traditions) includes chapters on clothing and struggles over identity in colonial western Kenya (Margaret Jean Hay); nation and dress in late colonial Luanda, Angola (Marissa Moorman); urban style, gender and the politics of 'national culture' in 1960s Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (Andrew M. Ivaska). Part 3 (Disciplined dress: gendered authority and national politics) presents chapters on dress and political transition in Nigeria (Elisha P. Renne); the politics of clothing in Nkrumah's Ghana (Jean Allman); miniskirts, gender relations and sexuality in Zambia (Karen Tranberg Hansen). Part 4 (African 'traditions' and global markets: the political economy of fashion and identity) contains chapters on the globalization of 'bogolan' or mudcloth, from Mali (Victoria L. Rovine); the role of African textiles in the politics of diasporic identity-making (Boatema Boateng). There is an afterword by Phyllis M. Martin. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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