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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:When Does an Indigene/Immigrant Become a Citizen? Reflections on the Nation-State in Contemporary Africa
Author:Abdullah, IbrahimISNI
Year:2003
Periodical:African Sociological Review (ISSN 1027-4332)
Volume:7
Issue:2
Pages:113-117
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:nation
nationality
Politics and Government
colonialism
History and Exploration
Ethnic and Race Relations
sociology
Conflicts
immigrants
indigenous peoples
social history
citizenship
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/43657706
Abstract:Did the nation precede the formation of the modern State in Africa? Or was the State created before the nation was born? These questions are central, in the author's view, to understanding the nature and substance of conflicts in contemporary Africa. The State that was created under colonial enlightenment was an exclusive project that served the needs of the colonizing 'other' and the precapitalist ruling groups. The configuration of forces under this dispensation did not allow for the development of a civil society. This exclusive paradigm came under strain during the period of decolonization. The divisions between the civic and the ethnic are crucial to understanding the notion of citizenship in Africa. In theory, citizenship is available to all nationals in every African country. Indigeneship, however, is restricted to natives, with roots in a particular space/community. The immigrant/non-indigene dialectic restricts the rights of people based on their perceived externality to an area. The citizenship discourse should be reconfigured to engage meaningfully with the different forms and patterns of exclusion prevalent in the continent. Ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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