Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database
Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:How African States Keep Their People Poor: The Legal Issues
Author:Veit, Peter G.ISNI
Year:2006
Periodical:South African Journal of International Affairs
Volume:13
Issue:2
Pages:33-52
Language:English
Geographic terms:Africa
Cameroon
Uganda
Subjects:inequality
government policy
forest policy
natural resource management
revenue allocation
Politics and Government
Economics and Trade
Agriculture, Natural Resources and the Environment
External link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10220460609556801
Abstract:Inequalities in income and in health, educational, and environmental outcomes are a stark fact of life in many developing countries. This article addresses the role of government in shaping the distribution of environmental benefits and in establishing the winners and losers in Africa. Two cases are presented to highlight the issues involved: the regulation of forest access in Cameroon and the allocation of public (including nature-based) revenues in Uganda. Four principal conclusions can be drawn from these two cases: for some environmental goods, certain actors or regions capture disproportionately large shares of the total benefits; government policies can influence the distribution of environmental benefits; in some cases, there is a disjuncture between government policy on environmental distributions and actual practice; the stated objectives of government distribution policies are not always achieved. Policy recommendations for the fairer distribution of environmental benefits in Cameroon and Uganda conclude the article. Notes, ref. [ASC Leiden abstract]
Views

Cover