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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Popular Media for HIV/AIDS Prevention? Comparing Two Comics: Kingo and the Sara Communication Initiative
Author:Beck, Rose M.ISNI
Year:2006
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:44
Issue:4
Period:December
Pages:513-541
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:AIDS
information dissemination
comic strips
Health and Nutrition
Literature, Mass Media and the Press
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/4486702
Abstract:This paper draws attention to some assumptions implicit in HIV/AIDS communication or prevention campaigns which use popular culture media, in this instance comics. Theoretically the analysis is placed in a framework of popular culture as the arena of negotiations about claims over hegemonic discourses. Methodologically the internal logics of a local Swahili comic from the magazine 'Kingo' (East Africa, mainly Tanzania) and of a comic from the 'Sara' Initiative in Swahili (UNICEF-ESARO, Africa-wide) are explored through a comparative textual analysis, focusing on differences and convergences in the use of dramaturgy and characterization of the protagonists. The transformations of locally known comic characters and the differences in dramaturgical strategies are made visible in the comparison, exposing the communicative, historical and social underpinnings of both comics. It is argued that as long as these preconditions of the international campaigns, as well as of local popular culture production are not thoroughly explored, hegemonic Western claims of knowledge of HIV/AIDS will be rejected by people in Africa (and why not?). The paper recommends that prevention design allow for 'moments of freedom' understood 'as the potential to transform one's thoughts, emotions and experience into creations that can be communicated and shared' (J. Fabian, 1998). Bibliogr., notes, ref., sum. [Journal abstract]
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