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Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Subaltern sexualities
Editors:Salo, ElaineISNI
Gqola, Pumla DineoISNI
Horn, Jessica
Year:2006
Periodical:Feminist Africa (ISSN 1726-460X)
Issue:6
Pages:111
Language:English
Geographic terms:Africa
South Africa
Senegal
Zimbabwe
Subjects:sexuality
gender relations
homosexuality
External link:http://www.agi.ac.za/agi/feminist-africa/06/
Abstract:The contributors to this issue of 'Feminist Africa' on subaltern sexualities in Africa explore the diversity of sexualities that exist across normative heterosexuality and homosexuality. While heterosexual masculine regimes appear hegemonic to notions of gender, personhood and sexualities in Africa, their dominance is fragile and contested. In her article 'Re-righting the sexual body', Jessica Horn interrogates the evocation of morality associated with an assumed authentic 'tradition' or 'culture' that is used to justify the tide of homophobia in Africa. In the same vein, Kopano Ratele argues that the recent rape trial of Jacob Zuma, erstwhile vice-president of South Africa, has fuelled debates about gender, permissible sexual relations, sexual rights and citizenship in postapartheid South Africa. In her tribute to Lorna Mlosana, Margie Orford maps out how men's desire to control women's sexuality through the rape epidemic in South Africa, coupled with the misogynistic notion that women are the primary vector of the HI virus, fuelled Lorna's murder. Chipo Hungwe addresses the meanings of heteronormative gender identities as these interlocked with race in the historical context of colonialism in Zimbabwe. Hudita Nura Mustafa examines Senegalese women's display of homosocial eroticism through the aesthetics of beauty. South African filmmaker Shelly Barry reflects on her sexuality as a disabled lesbian. Jessie Kabwira Kapasula presents literary and real-life examples of cross-dressing in African contexts. Elinor Sisulu reflects on the 50th anniversary of the famous march on the seat of apartheid power in 1956 by South African women. The issue also contains profiles of the organizations Sister Namibia and Sex Worker Education and Advocacy Task Force (SWEAT), and an interview with South African human rights lawyer Wendy Isaack. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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