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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Technical efficiency, efficiency change, technical progress and productivity growth in the national health systems of continental African countries
Authors:Kirigia, Joses M.ISNI
Asbu, E.Z.
Greene, W.
Emrouznejad, A.
Year:2007
Periodical:Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review (ISSN 1027-1775)
Volume:23
Issue:2
Period:June
Pages:19-40
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs., ills.
Geographic term:Africa
Subjects:efficiency
health care
Medicine, Nutrition, Public Health
National health services
Medical technology
Health services administration
research
External link:http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eastern_africa_social_science_research_review/v023/23.2kirigia.pdf
Abstract:This study assesses the technical efficiency of the National Health Systems (NHSs) of African countries for producing maximum health outcomes, measured, for example, in terms of male and female life expectancies, as well as the changes in health productivity over time, with a view to analysing changes in efficiency and changes in technology. The analysis is based on five-year panel data (1999-2003) from all the 53 countries of continental Africa. The findings indicate that the NHSs of 49 countries were run inefficiently in 1999 and 2000; 50 were operated inefficiently in 2001; 48 ran inefficiently in 2002; and 47 operated inefficiently during 2003. All the 53 countries' national health systems registered improvements in total factor productivity attributable mainly to technical progress. Fifty-two countries did not experience any change in scale efficiency. Thirty countries' national health systems had a pure efficiency change (PEFFCH) index of less than one, signifying that those countries' NHSs pure efficiency contributed negatively to productivity change. African countries may need to critically evaluate the utility of institutionalizing the Malmquist total factor productivity (TFP) type of analysis to monitor changes in the economic efficiency and productivity of health systems over time. Bibliogr., sum. [ASC Leiden abstract]
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