Go to AfricaBib home

Go to AfricaBib home AfricaBib Go to database home

bibliographic database
Line
Previous page New search

The free AfricaBib App for Android is available here

Periodical issue Periodical issue Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Special issue: Election fever: Kenya's crisis
Editors:Cheeseman, NicISNI
Branch, DanISNI
Year:2008
Periodical:Journal of Eastern African Studies (ISSN 1753-1063)
Volume:2
Issue:2
Pages:165-367
Language:English
Geographic term:Kenya
Subjects:elections
2007
political conflicts
political violence
government policy
inequality
External link:https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjea20/2/2
Abstract:This special issue of the Journal of Eastern African Studies is devoted to the crisis in Kenya following the 2007 elections. After the introduction by Nic Cheeseman, Susanne D. Mueller discusses the political economy of Kenya's post-election crisis. Yash Ghai looks at the possible role of devolution in restructuring the Kenyan State. Julie MacArthur examines regional politics in the 2007 elections. George Gona looks at voting behaviour in Kenya's Coast Province. Travis R. Kavulla pays attention to the politics of Member of Parliament (MP) Margaret Wanjiru, Bishop of the Pentecostal Church. Justin Willis looks at the electoral campaigns of the 2007 presidential candidates. Michael Bratton and Mwangi S. Kimenyi examine the possible role of ethnicity in the 2007 elections. David W. Throup tells the story of the counting of the votes in the 2007 elections. John Lonsdale uses the Kenya post-election crisis to support the view that the changing relations between global pressures and States may exacerbate local conflicts that promote ethnocentric, exclusive concepts of belonging. Michelle Osborn shows how rumours partly fuelled Kenya's post-election crisis. David Anderson and Emma Lochery look at violence and exodus in Kenya's Rift Valley. Mwangi wa Githinji and Frank Holmquist point at exclusion as one of the causes of Kenya's post-election crisis. John Githongo highlights five connected myths that currently impede the understanding of Kenya's dilemma. [ASC Leiden abstract]
Views

Cover