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Periodical article Periodical article Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Assessing the impact of social capital and trust on active citizenship in Bonteheuvel, Cape Town
Author:Esau, Michelle V.ISNI
Year:2009
Periodical:Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies (ISSN 0258-9346)
Volume:36
Issue:3
Pages:381-402
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
Subjects:State-society relationship
social relations
townships
community participation
External link:https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02589341003600197
Abstract:The neo-liberal model of democracy emphasizes the importance of ordinary citizens engaging the State on issues affecting their day-to-day lives. In this regard the South African State introduced structures and institutions to facilitate engagements with ordinary citizens. The effectiveness of these institutions and structures, however, is influenced by a number of variables. Amongst other things, social capital is considered a key element to facilitating engagement between the State and citizens. In fact the South African State specifically invested in nurturing social capital in disadvantaged and marginalized communities through the introduction of structures such as ward committees. These committees were designed to act as agencies between the State and local communities through the activities of sector representatives and ward councillors. However, various political and social factors rendered the intentions of the ward committees dysfunctional in certain cases. It is in this context that the paper furthers the examination of the relationship of social capital and trust on active citizenship. It concludes that communities with social capital and trust were more active at exercising their citizenship than communities where social capital and trust is low. However, the results also suggest that trust is a more influential variable than social capital. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract]
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