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Book Book Leiden University catalogue Leiden University catalogue WorldCat catalogue WorldCat
Title:Care of the seriously sick and dying: perspectives from Ghana
Editors:Oppong, ChristineISNI
Antwi, Phyllis
Wśrness, KariISNI
Year:2009
Pages:305
Language:English
Series:IAS studies in the changing cultures of care
City of publisher:Bergen
Publisher:BRIC
ISBN:8274530780; 9788274530782
Geographic term:Ghana
Subjects:patients
death
health care
healing rites
faith healing
euthanasia
social networks
legislation
Abstract:These essays by medical practitioners, social scientists, lawyers and religious experts portray aspects of care of the seriously sick and dying in Ghana. This care is influenced by vibrant and diverse cultural traditions, including spiritual beliefs and herbalism as well as established biomedical practice. The combination of rapid modernization and the persistence of old customs create new challenges for caregivers and patients. This volume hopes to stimulate dialogue with a view to galvanizing political will and appropriate action in several areas, including the development of palliative care and the allocation of a greater share of health care resources to the most vulnerable. The volume has also been designed as a teaching tool. Contributions: Death, grief and care: a Christian outlook (Peter K. Sarpong); Care of the terminally ill in Ghana: a physician's perspective (Samuel K. Owusu); Legal and ethical issues in the care of the seriously ill in Ghana (Takyiwaa Manuh and Kofi Quashigah); Spiritual healing and care in African indigenous churches (Abraham Akrong); Stigma in the care of people living with HIV/AIDS and cancer in Accra (Phyllis Antwi and Deborah Atobrah); Care for the seriously sick children at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (Delali Badasu); Family networking and relationships in the care of the seriously ill (Brigid M. Sackey); Dagomba supernatural beliefs and care of the sick (Bawa Awalu); Crossing the river: views on death and euthanasia from the Dagaaba (Edward Nanbigne and Cuthbert Baataar); End-of-life care in Ghana and the Netherlands: good death bad death and euthanasia (Sjaak van der Geest); Epilogue: palliative care: in the family and hospice (Phyllis Antwi). [ASC Leiden abstract]
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